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MAC 2001: Sunny Daze, Eyeing the Future

MAC 2001
Poster Sessions

MAC 2001: Sunny Daze, Eyeing the Future

SUN DAZE to FRI DAZE: MEETING SPECIALIZED CONSUMER HEALTH INFORMATION NEEDS THROUGH AN OUTREACH PARTNERSHIP

By: Ann Duesing, Outreach Librarian, based at The University of Virginia's College at Wise, One College Avenue, Wise, VA 24293

Abstract:

The University of Virginia Health Sciences Outreach Librarian in Southwest Virginia is working with a rural community coalition to assist with development of the Mountain Laurel Cancer Resource and Information Center. Coalition members, many of whom are cancer survivors, want a community based, non clinical setting where cancer patients and their families can come to find support services and cancer information. The Outreach Librarian has written and received a grant from the Cancer Help Institute that provides a computer with a touch screen monitor, printer, and a monthly updated database subscription to cancer information that was developed in cooperation with the National Cancer Institute. Support for a program coordinator, who will work under the supervision of the Outreach Librarian, is currently being sought. Volunteers are being trained to work with the Cancer Help System. Training will be extended to utilization of MEDLINEplus and other Web and print resources.

The CA Help System is taken to community events and Health Fairs to provide cancer information and publicity for the Mountain Laurel Center. During the summer of 2001 the CA Help System home base will be moved to a regional senior citizens service center while funding is sought for a permanent home. The System will also continue to be used throughout the region. This poster will provide detailed information about the background and development of this partnership and the efforts to meet a specialized health information need.

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HELPING TO HEAL A CHILD'S GRIEF

By: Ilene N. Smith, Director, and Mary Addy, Consumer Librarian, Virginia Funkhouser Health Sciences Library, Rockingham Memorial Hospital, 235 Cantrell Avenue, Harrisonburg

Abstract:

This fall, the Virginia Funkhouser Health Sciences Library will become home for the children's grief collection of the Harrisonburg-Rockingham chapter of The Compassionate Friends. This collection for children in grief will encompass literature for toddlers through the teenage years. Age-appropriate realistic fiction involving stories of loss of pets, family members and friends will be available for circulation to the community. It will be a resource for The Compassionate Friends, counselors, and teachers.

The Compassionate Friends is an organization offering "friendship and understanding to bereaved parents, siblings and grandparents". We are delighted and honored that the Harrisonburg-Rockingham Chapter has chosen our library as the resource center for this collection. Recognizing the need for children to acknowledge, express, and resolve their grief in a positive manner, the Friends organization has generously agreed to donate the core collection and add books on a regular basis.

The Virginia Funkhouser Health Sciences Library houses both professional and patient/family collections of journals, books, pamphlets, and audio-visual materials. Access to the Internet and Health Reference Center is also available. The library serves medical professionals, staff, patients and their families, students, and the community. It is committed to the importance and support of patient care as well as ensuring that patients, their families, and the community have access to the resources they need to make informed choices about their health care.

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SUNNY DAZE; GW MEDICAL CENTER - COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS FUTURE POSSIBILITIES POSTER

By: Patricia Wilson, MLS, Associate Director, Outreach Services; Laura Abate, MLS, Reference Librarian; and Anne Linton, MA, Director, Library Services, The George Washington University, 2300 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037

Abstract:

In February 2000 the NN/LM SE/A region awarded The George Washington University two PARTNERS grants: PARTNERS - Primary Care Access to Training, Networks, Education, Research Services and PARTNERS - Consumer Health. The primary objectives were to equip 10 Non-Profit Clinic Consortium (NPCC) clinics with hardware, to provide access to web resources, to educate staff in resources such as PubMed and MDConsult, and to train patients to use health information resources to improve their health literacy and health decisions. The grant linked NPCC clinics to The George Washington University Medical Center's web-based health resources and established a listserv to facilitate communication among clinics. PARTNERS also provided document delivery to give clinics broader access to professional-level health information. PARTNERS is a collaboration among GWUMC's Himmelfarb Library staff, NPCC clinics, students from the GW School of Public Health & Health Services taking part in the ISCOPES project, GW undergraduates from the Health Advocates group, and Howard University students.

PARTNERS recently received approval for a second year. The project will expand to four Area Health Education Center (AHEC) sites while providing services to the original NPCC sites. New goals include developing locally relevant, linguistically and culturally appropriate health promotion materials, providing software to support people with lower literacy levels, and offering interpreter/translation services to non-English speakers to assist in their use of web resources. The poster will illustrate the various facets of the grant and plans for the second year.

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OBTAINING COPYRIGHT PERMISSIONS FOR COURSE RESERVE COLLECTIONS: COMPARING DIRECT REQUESTS TO THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER TO COPYRIGHT CLEARANCE CENTER SERVICES

By: Beverly Gresehover, Assistant Director for Access Services, and J. Dale Prince, Circulation Librarian, University of Maryland, Health Sciences and Human Services Library, 601 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-1512

Abstract:

The concept of Fair Use grants libraries certain rights allowing them to place copies of texts on reserve, making it the first and easiest method for copyright compliance; however, Fair Use has limits that make it a weak solution to the needs of library reserves collections. Other alternatives must be sought for acquiring the proper permissions for paper or electronic reserves over multiple terms or for extended periods of time. Going directly to the publisher is the traditional method for securing these rights. Complicating our choices is the availability of the Copyright Clearance Center, a one-stop-shop for obtaining permissions for reserve or other use. Each approach has its benefits and its drawbacks. Which is more effective?

While obtaining copyright permission for reserves, we have tracked our processes and their results, looking for a number of indicators including availability of copyright speed of response, type of permission received, time stipulations, ease of attaining the permissions, and low transaction costs. Greater weight is applied to permissions for electronic reserve that are granted quickly, inexpensively, for extended time limits, and with no unusual requirements.

The information collected is being used comparatively to determine the efficacy of each means of obtaining copyright. Moreover, it is possible that certain trends in terms of the CCC's maturity may be detected, for instance are more publishers using their services and how quickly are the Center's holdings growing. And, finally, since some libraries may be using both systems, our data may be used to determine the best approach to using the two in tandem.

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DIGITAL DOCUMENT DELIVERY IN WEST VIRGINIA: SUPPORTING HEALTH CARE EDUCATION THOURGH TECHNOLOGY

By: Nancy J. Wasson, Head, Access Services, West Virginia University Libraries/Health Sciences Library, Box 9801, Morgantown, WV 26506

Abstract:

The Health Sciences Library at West Virginia University has transformed several traditional services through digital technologies - reaching out to not only our local campuses but also to the various parts of our rural state. Digital document delivery via the Web provides access to current health care information to faculty, staff, and students who find it more convenient to receive requested articles electronically without coming to the library; the Rural Health Education Rotation students in the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy completing their field assignments at numerous sites throughout the state; clinical/field faculty and hospitals throughout West Virginia; and health care practitioners in various areas of the state. While our initial efforts have included home grown systems utilizing basic software, procedures, methodologies, we continue to explore what is being used elsewhere as well as staying abreast of new open-source products in addition to commercial software developments, e.g. Prospero, Relais Express, Ariel enhancements, etc. We continue to test new products designed for digital document delivery management and expect to see continued improvement and refinement in how we provide electronic document delivery. The vast majority of articles that the Health Sciences Library borrows or lends are sent directly to the user's desktop. The issues involved in getting full-text documents to the user's desktop, the collaborative efforts involved, the software/hardware requirements, and the user education necessary for successfully utilizing digital information will be explored. Electronic information delivery is no longer considered cutting edge but a service deemed essential by library users.

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DOCLINE - TIME FOR A CHANGE

By: Tillie Horak, Library Associate, Harrison Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21224

Abstract:

Gone are the days of relying on ALA forms and the US Postal Service to deliver ILLs. New technology, reduced length of stay, managed care, and budget cuts are now mandating that libraries rely more heavily on interlibrary loans instead of journal subscriptions and a more expedient and efficient means of obtaining them. This presentation attempts to look at some of the changes that have been made and some that still need to be made.

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PROTECTION AND THE HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY: KEY LEGISLATIVE ISSUES

By: Carolyn Willard, A.M.L.S. AHIP, Reference Librarian, Public Services Division, National Library Of Medicine, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD 20894

Abstract:

The primary issue, that has concerned librarians in the last few years and will continue into the future, is copyright and intellectual property protection legislation. In the never-ending confrontation between library and private corporations, both sides debate the meaning of "fair use". Components of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (or "anti-piracy" law) enacted in 1998 and UCITA: The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act, which will be debated in state legislatures, have not made librarians happy. Learn what the perceived problems are and possible ways to make your voice heard.

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JOURNAL RENEWALS - AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF THE PIE

By: Tillie Horak, Library Associate, Harrison Medical Library, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21224

Abstract:

Jrens (as it is fondly called in our library) is short for Journal Renewals. Journal subscriptions, in most hospital libraries, account for the largest portion of the budget. To take the process of jrens lightly is to do a great disservice to the institution as a whole, as well as the library patrons. This presentation will describe the agonizing process we use to scrutinize our journal collection, give our users more of what they need, keeping both them and the finance department happy.

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NEW FRONTIERS: THE LIBRARY LIAISON PROGRAM, GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL

By: Richard Billingsley, MSLS, Coordinator of Information and Instruction; Patricia Wilson, MLS, Associate Director, Outreach Services; and Anne Linton, MS, Director, Library Services, The George Washington University, 2300 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037

Abstract:

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences' longitudinal course, the Practice of Medicine (POM), addresses the need to combine the pre-clinical sciences with the practice of clinical medicine. This four year course allows students to develop skills in clinical assessment and decision making. The POM I course is divided into three segments - Primary Care Apprenticeship; Doctor, Patient and Society and Problem-Based Learning (PBL).

Reference librarians from the Himmelfarb Library were assigned to PBL groups as librarian liaisons. Their charge was to facilitate the critical examination of the literature students used to meet their learning objectives. The librarians attended weekly sessions with the students and tutors.

Six clinical cases were discussed. The first session introduced cases via video presentations or scripted patient interviews. Students then developed lists of learning objectives. The librarian liaison assisted students in locating information resources on the listed topics and in applying critical review and appraisal skills. In the following sessions, the participants presented the information, developed additional learning objectives, and received further case information. Each case ended with a class session where a physician(s) and patient discussed the condition from their individual perspectives.

Feedback from the students and librarians has been positive. This program promotes relationships among library staff and students that will continue throughout their educational years. It also provides outreach to the faculty members serving as PBL tutors about library services. The poster will illustrate the library liaison program with first year medical students.

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UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PDA INITIATIAVE

By: Karen Crowell, Health Informatics Fellow, and Julia Shaw-Kokot, Education Services Coordinator, Health Sciences Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB# 7585, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7585

Abstract:

In Spring of 2001, the School of Medicine (SOM) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made the decision to require third and fourth year medical students to own Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs). This student-initiated decision provided funds for students as part of their financial aid package to cover the cost of hardware and software. Requirements specified that students purchase PDAs using Palm OS software. Student support would be provided by the Office of Information Systems department in the SOM. At the same time, the Health Sciences Library (HSL) included as one of its objectives in its strategic plan for 2001/2002 investigating the library's role in providing content and services accessible through PDAs.

This poster will illustrate the ways in which the Office of Information Systems and the Health Sciences Library have collaborated thus far in (1) defining roles, (2) providing training sessions to introduce the students to the basic features and software available for PDAs and (3) providing information via the Web about PDA hardware and software products available. Data will be collected from the medical students after they have had experience using PDAs that will help the OIS and the HSL determine (1) how and to what extent the medical students use PDAs, (2) what products to recommend for individual, institutional purchase or development and (3) satisfaction with the level of training and support. Assessing needs will help the OIS and the HSL in planning for the future as the use of PDAs continues to evolve and extend into other health-related fields.

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PROVIDING EFFECTIVE ACCESS TO JOURNALS IN THE FIELD OF COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS

By: Judy Anderson, Liaison Librarian to Communication Sciences & Disorders Dept., Carrier Library, Technical Services, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807

Abstract:

Problem: How do we provide effective access to journals in the CSD field?
Solution: Use a multi-access approach from a centralized subject guide web page by:

Identifying CSD Journals:

An extensive journal review was initiated in the fall of 1998 when the Communication Sciences and Disorders Dept. (CSD Dept.) was engaged in its academic program review process. During that time the liaison librarian and the Dept. collaborated together in developing a comprehensive, yet core list of CSD journals, a non-to-easy task in itself as no single-source up-to-date published list existed for this field. [Poster and/or handout could include a bibliography of resources used to compile list]

Evaluating CSD Journals within the Context of Local Needs:

This list was further revised during a library-wide review of all journals with all departments on campus the following year, during which the CSD Dept. was provided with various cost-use statistics and information on electronic journal availability. Supporting data resulted in no cancellations and resulted in a list of potential new acquisitions.

Providing Technical Access to All Journals, Including Electronic Journal Articles:

State-wide VIVA-consortia efforts during this same time resulted in increased electronic journal 'collection' access (ex: ScienceDirect). Local cataloging and other efforts now provide bibliographic and article access to these resources through a multi-access approach, from one central gateway, the library CSD subject guide page http://library.jmu.edu/communication/index.html. Links from the journal page http://library.jmu.edu/communication/journals.html refer the user back to the online catalog to either browser title lists or to a journal title-specific search engine http://library.jmu.edu/journals/search.html. URL links from online catalog bibliographic records may provide access to the electronic journals. The CSD subject guide home page also provides links to relevant abstract-index databases http://library.jmu.edu/databases/commspec.html which in turn may have links to journal articles, via JMU-provided subscription holdings information.
[This poster may provide more detailed information on how various browser title links and other links were created (ex: tagging appropriate catalog records with a common denominator LCSH heading), and how they are maintained].

Latest Developments: New avenues of access to journal literature, such as linking to and from Blackboard and other options may also be addressed.

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SHOW ME THE MONEY: THE REALITY OF LIBRARY COSTS

By: Richard J. Behles, Historical Librarian/Preservation Officer, University of Maryland Health Sciences & Human Services Library; Chair, "Show Me The Money" Exhibit Committee

Abstract:

It is no secret that libraries have struggled with annual increases in subscription costs of print-based journals, joined now by increases in license fees and other associated costs for electronic resources. Unfortunately, traditional sources of funding fail to keep pace in support of these escalating expenses. We became intrigued with the idea of dramatizing for our users the similarities between the costs of needed resources, and a variety of real-world goods. We assembled an exhibit in a variety of media, to demonstrate these comparisons. Scanned copies of journal covers lay side-by-side with ads for such desirables as world cruises, luxurious sport cars, and refrigerator/freezers. This offered an interesting perspective on the nature of many "must-have" titles, as they are likened to big-ticket items that many of us can never afford. Individual cost factoids decorated study tables and restroom stalls, reminding the public about discrepancies between rising costs and dwindling available funds, and dispelling the misconception that "tuition covers it." Selected examples graced the screen of our web page. A common theme throughout was the fact that when we buy these expensive items, we do so every year, at progressively higher costs each time. This poster affords a glimpse of our presentation, and a look at some of the interesting comparisons.

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THE ILLIAD EXPERIENCE AT UVA: WAITING FOR THE RIGHT TIME FOR SHOWTIME

By: Daniel T. Wilson, Assistant Director for Collection Management & Access Services, Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia

The University of Virginia Health Sciences Library purchased ILLiad in the spring of 2000 with the goal of going live in September 2000. It soon became apparent, however, that the targeted release date was unrealistic due to customization requirements and enhancements needed in the billing module and Ovid ordering. This poster will display a timeline from the decision to order ILLiad through the first three months of using the system. It will highlight key points along the timeline, such as reviewing policies, activating the lending module, working with Atlas and Ovid to create an ordering interface with Ovid and ILLiad, marketing decisions, releasing the borrowing module, handling photocopy orders, and incorporating desktop delivery into the daily routine of Document Delivery staff. The poster will contain early use statistics of desktop ordering as well as patron reaction to paperless ordering and desktop delivery. Graphics on the poster will include screen shots of selected ILLiad pages, photographs of equipment, and charts of usage. I will also have a laptop along to demonstrate ordering documents through Ovid and how desktop delivery works in ILLiad. Handouts of the poster session will also be available for conference attendees.

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PROVIDING VIRTUAL REFERENCE SERVICES FOR DISTANCE ED STUDENTS IN THE iMPH PROGRAM AT JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

By: Catharine Canevari, Education Librarian, Welch Medical Library, JHU 1900 East Monument Street, Baltimore, MD 21205; Donna Hesson, Manager, Bradley Otterson, Instruction Librarian, and David Wright, Reference Specialist, Lilienfeld Library, JHU, 624 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205

Abstract:

The Welch Medical Library at Johns Hopkins University has served the needs of the School of Public Health internet-based M.P.H (iMPH) program since June 1999. Students are oriented to library services during an on-campus training session. Initial training is supplemented by virtual reference support provided via synchronous and asynchronous techniques (chat, bbs, email, and phone). During the Fall 2000 semester, the library participated in Internet-based chat sessions where staff promoted new services, answered resource questions, and solved technical problems. A library-oriented electronic bulletin board was established with various threaded topics (such as Announcements and News and Technical Questions and Answers). Students posted questions/comments to the bulletin board allowing others to benefit from this dynamically created knowledgebase. Librarians automatically receive posted messages via email and direct responses to the sender and the bulletin board. Implementation of a proxy server in October 2000 made it possible to provide students with virtual access to library electronic resources. Resource guides posted to the bulletin board answered technical questions and provided tips for conducting research. The library is currently working to make the iMPH student experience more similar to that of on campus students by creating electronic archives of talks held during the Spring 2001 Lecture Series. Archives will contain digitized copies of both the audio recording of the lecture as well as MSPowerPoint slides used by lecturers. Welch library continues to evaluate our relationship with the iMPH students and looking for innovative ways to improve our service to this patron group.

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TELECOMMUTING IN 2001: HOW TECHNOLOGY CAN OVERCOME DISTANCE

By: JoLinda Thompson, Systems Librarian and Beth Layton, Deputy Director, Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, The George Washington University, 2300 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037

Abstract:

Telecommuting from Anchorage, Alaska to support a staff located in Washington, DC would have been impossible and unheard of ten years ago. But technologies that emerged over the last decade have helped to make distance less of a factor for workers. E-mail, the internet, networked workplaces, and instant messaging make real-time communications and sharing of work with distant co-workers possible. Administrators at Himmelfarb Health Sciences Library, George Washington University Medical Center decided to gamble on the new technologies by hiring back part-time a former systems librarian who recently moved to Alaska. This staff member supported the Library's integrated library system and had worked in two Library Operations positions for four years before she moved in 1999. She was re-hired in June of 2000 to maintain the ILS, troubleshoot ILS related problems, implement new ILS based services, and support and train other library staff members on the system. The telecommuting experiment has thus far been productive and beneficial for both the telecommuting staff member and staff on-site. This paper will elaborate on technologies used to work successfully with a distant staff member. Non-technical factors that should be considered when establishing a telecommuting position will also be discussed. Issues will be examined from both the telecommuter's and manager's perspective.

Full poster:

PDF Format | Word Format

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GO LOCAL! CREATING A WEB RESOURCE OF LOCAL HEALTH INFORMATION FOR NORTH CAROLINIANS

By: Peggy Hull, Project Coordinator, and Christie Silbajoris, Project Assistant, NC Health Information Online, Health Sciences Library at UNC, Chapel Hill

Abstract:

What if there was a way to find local health information on the Internet? Consumer health information has exploded recently. Hundreds of government, commercial and private health sites containing more information than most lay people can handle are available at the click of a mouse. NLM's MEDLINEplus is the premier consumer health website, with authoritative information on a board range of health topics. Disease information is abundant and universally applicable. But something's missing…local health information resources exist but can be very difficult to find. Examples of local health concerns are…

A subcontract from the National Library of Medicine enabled a project to propose how a local health resource can be created to address the health needs of North Carolinians. We envision a user who chooses a "Go Local" button on MEDLINEplus being offered an array of local resources addressing their concerns. The preliminary subcontract focused on the best ways to make local information available, and explored the feasibility of linking the resources with the MEDLINEplus. Project methodologies can be replicated in other states, leading to widespread availability of local health information. This poster will present the status of the project, and perspectives for the future.

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HEALTH LITERACY AND THE AGED

By: Gary R. Greenstein, MLSIS, MPA, AHIP, Reference Collection Development Librarian, and Patricia Greenstein, MLS, AHIP, Assistant Director for Resources Management, William E. Laupus Health Sciences Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4354

Abstract:

Health illiteracy is a stealthy and hidden problem. People with this problem come from all classes of society. They can be poised, well dressed and very articulate, or, they can meet your expectations by being homeless, dirty and educationally handicapped.

The aged seem to be at special risk for this problem as reading ability declines with age, no matter the subject's educational level. Aged patients cannot articulate their health care needs and have trouble understanding information they are given.

In today's society literacy is taken for granted, Everyone is assumed to be literate enough to read a newspaper (most are written at a 6th grade literacy level), read traffic signs (if you can't you don't drive), and understand directions you are given. How many people do you know that can't accomplish one or more of these tasks? Are they illiterate? Or, are they just old enough that their eyes don't "work properly"; their ears aren't as good as they used to be". They walk with the aid of a cane or walker because their limbs and reflexes suffer from the effects of Arthritis, Rheumatism, or Diabetes. All of these symptoms can be blamed on "Old Age" and all can affect a person's level of literacy.

How wide spread is the problem, and what can we, as librarians, aging medical consumers, and information professionals suggest to physicians, and patients to help allay this problem? Includes a literature review and analysis.

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REACHING CLINICIANS WHEN AND WHERE THEY ARE READY TO LEARN: AN EXPERIMENT IN VIRTUAL LIBRARY INSTRUCTION

By: Cindy Sheffield, Instruction Coordinator, Welch Medical Library, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 1900 E. Monument St., Baltimore, Maryland 21205

Abstract:

Clinical residents, fellows and faculty are constantly juggling multiple demands for their time. Increasing clinical responsibilities and documentation requirements impinge on the physicians' time to conduct research for both academic study and patient care. Fortunately many resources are available by remote access, but knowing which to use and navigating the interface is not always easy. Physicians do not have the time to hunt for resources or jump a learning curve to get the information they need.

To this end, an On-line Orientation has been provided so physicians can learn about resources and how to use them, when and where they are ready. So often these types of tutorials are designed and placed on the web, never to be used. In order to study this particular orientation, a group of residents volunteered one or more hours to evaluate its usefulness. Although the test group of five residents was too small for scientific analysis, general observations were made and suggestions for further improvements developed.

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Last Updated: August 27, 2001